What the world needs now is liberal arts learn'in

What the world needs now is liberal arts learn'in

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theatlantic:

The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform

Here’s the curious thing: Those who criticize recent private-sector interest in boosting student achievement never utter a peep about the billions in profits that publishing houses and construction firms have (legitimately) earned through our schools over the decades. What accounts for their selective antipathy?

Read more. 
Can we/should we teach to “maximize shareholder value”?

theatlantic:

The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform

Here’s the curious thing: Those who criticize recent private-sector interest in boosting student achievement never utter a peep about the billions in profits that publishing houses and construction firms have (legitimately) earned through our schools over the decades. What accounts for their selective antipathy?

Read more. 

Can we/should we teach to “maximize shareholder value”?

Filed under education teaching teaching methods private sector education we adams liberal arts

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Do we have a follower problem?

We constantly focus on the “leadership” problem. We seem to assume that following is merely a natural and subjective response to the quality of leadership. But do we have an intrinsic follower problem as well? Do “followers” even know how to recognize leaders? Are “victims” of oppression at the hands of the powerful our only source of heroism these days?

Filed under education leadership teaching we adams

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techedblog:

How Do We Make Online Education More Than Video Lectures?

We should spend less time at universities filling our students’ minds with content by lecturing at them, and more time igniting their creativity … by actually talking with them.” (Daphne Koller)

In the past year there’s been a real boom in online education platforms, but what sets these models apart from the average lecture-on-demand model? According to Stanford professor Daphne Koller, whose startup Coursera launched in February and has 640,000 students from 190 countries, if they really want to reach the masses, online learning platforms have to provide more than just video lectures.

Indeed, in this TED talk, Koller shares how Coursera has tried to figure out how to bring a “real course experience” to the table. Doing so, says Koller, makes it possible to offer a “top quality education to everyone around the world for free.” That would go a long way toward establishing “education as a fundamental human right,” making lifelong learning the norm, and paving the way for a new era of innovation.

SOURCE: GOOD.IS

Inspiring. Progressive. For those of us whose vision is to inspire others to desire learning, how can we participate or help funnel interest toward Coursera?

Filed under teaching teaching methods Coursera education we adams

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Having trouble getting that 16 year old (or even 35 year old) child to understand that great works of literature were written prior to Halo or Transformers? Wish you could get them interested in what happened in the world prior to the advent of Steve Jobs? The History Teachers might be helpful to you. They have developed quite a following and are great examples of how to use various modes of communication in the modern world to spark interest in history. Enjoy a little “learn’in” here about Dante’s Divine Comedy!

How can the approach used by the History Teachers help you in your work?

Filed under education History History Teachers teaching we adams Teaching methods

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Outstanding advice from the “History Teachers” (some of you may know them from their excellent YouTube site). The History Teachers demonstrate how using various modes of communication (video, music, technology…etc.) can strike interest into the minds and hearts of the general population. They have a really great model for doing exactly the thing I strive to do (though I do it with far less talent and creativity): catalyze an intrinsic motivation for learning in people. Way to go History Teachers!

What do you think of the History Teachers?

Filed under education we adams History teachers liberal arts

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This is a fantastic display of the teamwork involved in rowing crew. As a former Princeton Tiger crew member (though on the men’s lightweight crew - that’s right - lightweight. Hey, it was a long time ago!), I am partial to this display by the Princeton women’s crew team.

I like to use analogies when I teach. Analogies are powerful tools for learning. In particular, I like to use crew as an analogy for teaching teamwork and strategic leadership (because I have actual experience with it! It is much easier to use analogies with which you are familiar). What do you note about crew as a sport compared to any other team sport like basketball or football? How does this analogy relate to strategic leadership and building teamwork around a common vision?

Filed under we adams strategic leadership strategy Princeton Crew Teamwork analogy vision

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But there is one thing that I have never from my youth up been able to understand. I have never been able to understand where people got the idea that democracy was in some way opposed to tradition. It is obvious that tradition is only democracy extended through time. It is trusting to a consensus of common human voices rather than to some isolated or arbitrary record.

G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, chapter on “The Ethics of Elfland.”

How does Chesterton’s observation relate to our modern culture and political scene? (The “answer” box is not showing up - if you would like to comment, simply write in the “Ask me anything” section.)

Filed under liberal arts G.K. Chesterton politics democracy tradition we adams

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The Battle of Hastings, 1066 AD. Can you guess why I like this video? (Hint - think of Ancestry.com)

I enjoy showing this video for my course participants. How does our own history and ancestry affect our view of the world and our ability to foster positive, cross-cultural work environments?

(The “answer” box is not showing up - if you would like to comment, simply write in the “Ask me anything” section.)

Filed under Battle of Hastings History Middle Ages William the Conqueror liberal arts